best way to train a player

General discussions about the 1st version of Tennis Elbow Manager

best way to train a player

Postby Guest » 16 Jun 2008, 00:50

what is the best way to get a player better? What aspects would you train the most?
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Postby Curtis » 16 Jun 2008, 07:19

I have only been playing the game for two months now (real time). So far I have found it most efficient to to do three things:

1) Save your experience points for increasing mental skills. Using them to 'buy' victories in tournaments is mostly a waste until you cannot increase the mental skills anymore. An exception might be if you NEED a victory to reach a sponsor bonus, to get into the main draw of a crucial tournament, or to improve the player's ranking to meet a contract deadline. I would never do it just to earn some money unless the player was well developed.

2) Any week the player is at the training center (which I try to make about half the time), I always put twelve hours into training physical skills. Until the skills are nearing their potentials I train two hours each at footing, weight training, sprinting, bicycling, swimming and yoga.

Eventually you will reach a point where swimming and bicycling will not help you, so drop them and do three hours each on the other four. At a later point you can drop footing and bump the remaining exercises up to four hours.

At this point you will have to keep an eye on how close your speed and strength are getting to their potentials. If one is much closer than the other, than cut back on that training and increase the opposite type.

After doing the physical training I always put in six hours resting, then do some mental exercises (if I have experience points stored up). Only when that is done do I look at training the technical skills. And be sure to leave enough hours at the end of the week to rest yourself back up to near 100%!

3) Never neglect to spar when a partner is available. It is the most efficient way to improve the aggregate of your technical skills. Unfortunately, you never know which skills will improve the most (or at all).

If your sparring partner either always wins or always loses, you aren't getting much effect from your sparring, so maybe you should do physical training instead (which, like sparring, does not require an expensive coach or assistant to be present).

I frequently (meaning more than once every time I play) refer to the documentation. In this case you should especially look at the descriptions of styles of play (puncher, counter, etc.) to see what skills your player's style relies upon, and the list of 'most important skills' that Emmanuelle included.

If you find that your sparring is causing you to increase mostly in skills that don't particularly benefit your player, or if your player is becoming very unbalanced (mostly forehand, for example) you will need to hire a trainer who can help you learn the skills you need to bring yourself back into balance, or else spend much longer to learn them from just your coach.

I find that I do not have the money to hire assistants or trainers until six or (more likely) nine months into the game, and that is when I have two beginning and two advanced players. With four beginning players it is more like fifteen months. By that time their physical and mental skills should be very nearly up to their potentials. Once there, you will still need to put in maybe six hours a week at each to keep them there.

That is when I would look at hiring the +20/+25% trainers to work on their technical skills. If you can afford trainers before then, get the one who helps with mental and physical skills. Emily (the default player) can crush a player with 45% technical skills when her own technicals are around 18-20%, but her mentals are 50+ and her physicals 40-60%. It is really quite amazing (and gratifying)!

If you have any advice to share with us, please feel free to do so. (Oh, one small secret — If you are going to train physical and technical skills in the same week, or physical and spar, do the physical first. It raises some of your technical potentials, and the bigger the difference between your actual and potential rating, the bigger the increase you will get from training that skill. :wink: )
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Postby Guest » 16 Jun 2008, 19:33

now your talking about a womens career right? Is it the same for the men's?

I think a mistake I make is that I always improve the technical skills the most.
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Postby Curtis » 17 Jun 2008, 18:34

I have never played an ATP tour, but it would be odd if the two tours worked differently.

Improving the technical skills first is not neccessarily wrong. It has just been my experience that the technical skills improve more slowly. Since it appears that each category of skills (mental, physical, technical) has about the same effect on success, it seems to me that my players advance more rapidly when they train first in the things that will improve most quickly.

This may just be me, but it also feels like it takes many more training hours to maintain a high technical skill level. As I mentioned in the previous post, about twelve hours a week will keep all of the physical and mental skills up to the level of their potentials (once you get them that high). The technical skills seem to require many more hours to keep them from deteriorating, even when they are twenty points below their potentials. (One of my girls has service potentials near 80, but it is almost impossible for me to keep her as high as 63.)

Part of this may be because I am playing on the highest level of difficulty. I know that there is a real, noticable difference in how the game plays as you go up each level. At the two lowest levels I seem to remember that the technical skills advance as rapidly as the others, and I do not remember a problem maintaining skills until the next-to-highest level.

So, if you are playing at one of the lower levels, my advice may not be worth much to you! :roll: I should have asked your level of difficulty before starting this.
Curtis
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Postby Guest » 18 Jun 2008, 15:28

I usually play in Junior difficulty. i will try your advice with my new player Flavio Saretta.
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Postby Curtis » 23 Jun 2008, 03:16

Please let us know how Flavio is progressing.
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Postby Ibarrategui » 28 Aug 2008, 16:41

What do you mean when you speak about "buying a victory" with experience points? I don't understand...
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Postby Rob4590 » 28 Aug 2008, 17:59

Ibarrategui wrote:What do you mean when you speak about "buying a victory" with experience points? I don't understand...


When you are about to start a match, you can spend up to 40 experience points to boost certain of your stats, and thus increase your chances of winning the match. It's done by clicking (I think) the star shaped icon on the match screen, but only before you start the match.
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Postby Ibarrategui » 28 Aug 2008, 18:23

Rob4590 wrote:
Ibarrategui wrote:What do you mean when you speak about "buying a victory" with experience points? I don't understand...


When you are about to start a match, you can spend up to 40 experience points to boost certain of your stats, and thus increase your chances of winning the match. It's done by clicking (I think) the star shaped icon on the match screen, but only before you start the match.


OOOOH!

I've never seen that I could change tactics, implication and use experience... Before you tell me that, I wonder what these buttons mean... :oops: :idea:
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Postby Curtis » 29 Aug 2008, 02:30

After a player has reched her maximums in the mental skills, I will start scheduling tournaments in such a way as to build up experience points to near one hundred just before a big tournament. If a player has 100 points when starting (for example) the Australian Open, you could spend ten points in the first round, twenty each in the second and third and forty in the round of sixteen to increase your chances to advance.

Of course, each round you will earn additional points, and if you are also playing doubles, even more, so you might end up having forty points available in each of several rounds.

If you do not think a player will advance far, then spend as much as you can early, or save it for doubles play. I have sometimes (three times in only a few years of play) upset the number one or two seed in the first round with a player ranked 100+, just because I spent the forty points to get a 20% boost. Of course, more often the points were wasted, but remember that you almost always earn more points from a loss than from a victory. Frequently my players get fifteen points for losing, so spending twenty means nothing, and even forty does not hurt that much.

With practice you will learn to gauge when you need ten points, when twenty and when forty. Most of the time, of course, you will not spend any, trying to build up a reserve instead. :wink:
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Postby Ibarrategui » 29 Aug 2008, 09:40

I've tried yesterday to use this experience boost...

Nicolas Mahut (one of my players) reached Hamburg SF, beating Gonzalez and Gaudio, with these boosts. He lost in 3 sets against Robredo, but this was a good tournament for him (he's lost quickly in IW, Miami and Monte-Carlo)
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Postby Rob4590 » 29 Aug 2008, 14:30

On a sort of related topic - does anyone use the different styles for their player? If so - when - and what success have you had with it?

I've never used it, as having the negative to your skills seems strange to me.
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Postby Curtis » 02 Sep 2008, 02:10

I do not use them. It seems to me that the only times it might be useful would be if a player was very good in the skills of another style, or if s/he was playing on a surface that was extremely bad for their normal style.

I would prefer to have my players emphasize the skills that apply to their own style, and I try not to schedule them for tournaments on extreme opposite surfaces, though that can not always be done.

Also, note that a 'varied' player, and/or one that took a particular advantage (Chameleon, I think) upon creation have much smaller penalties, and might be able to take advantage of changing his/her style to better suit their present court surface when most could not. (That's 'could not' assuming that I am right, of course. :wink: )
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